Sustainability Action Plan

UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-STOUT CAMPUS SUSTAINABILITY ACTION PLAN 2018 - 2019 Update

SUSTAINABILITY Learn more at www.uwstout.edu/sustainability

TABLE OF CONTENTS

2-3

ACUPCC Charter Signatory

Measuring and Understanding UW-Stout’s Greenhouse Gas Emissions

5-11

Mitigation Initiatives UW-Stout has Employed (2009-2015)

13-19

Breaking Down our Accomplishments and Goals

INTRODUCTION

What We’ve Accomplished

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16-19

The UW-Stout Campus Sustainability Action Plan provides the framework for the development of sustainability initiatives as UW-Stout moves toward the goal of campus climate neutrality by 2050. The purpose of the plan is to: Identify priority areas of interest, concern, or opportunity to achieve climate neutrality and move toward sustainable development

21-35

Future Mitigation Strategies

Building and Energy Strategies

Landscape Strategies

24-25

22-23

Utilize data to track, evaluate, and report progress

Transportation Strategies

Water Strategies

28-29

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Set targets for reducing emissions

Pinpoint initiatives to help achieve targets

Procurement Strategies

Waste Strategies

31

30

Food Strategies

Curriculum Strategies

34-35

32-33

Appendix 1: Sustainability Steering Committee Membership

36

Appendix 2: 2015 GHG Emissions Reduction Targets

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1

Our original Climate Action Plan was written by UW-Stout’s Sustainability Steering Committee. This Climate Action Plan laid out UW-Stout’s goals for reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 2015 (see Appendix A). In 2016-2017 academic year, UW-Stout’s Sustainability Steering Committee received a charge from Chancellor Bob Meyer to “perform a comprehensive update to the Campus Sustainability Action Plan to incorporate measures for achieving new 2020 GHG emissions goals.” The SSC made substantial updates, and since that time the sustainability office has updated this plan annually. During 2015-2016, UW-Stout’s Sustainability Steering Committee made recommendations for new greenhouse gas emissions goals to be achieved by 2020, which are detailed in this plan. Developed an institutional Climate Action Plan for becoming climate neutral. The Climate Action Plan was completed and submitted to the ACUPCC on September 15, 2009. In 2015, the Climate Action Plan was re-named to “Campus Sustainability Action Plan” by UW-Stout’s Strategic Planning Group. Completed a comprehensive Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Inventory, including emissions from electricity, heating and cooling, commuting, air travel, waste, and much more. UW-Stout’s first GHG Inventory was completed on November 15, 2008. On September 12th, 2007, UW-Stout became a Charter Signatory of the American College and Universities President’s Climate Commitment, a high-visibility effort to address global warming by garnering institutional commitments to neutralize greenhouse gas emissions, and to accelerate the research and educational efforts of higher education to equip society to re-stabilize the earth’s climate. Chancellor Emeritus Charles W. Sorensen signed this climate commitment, indicating that UW-Stout agrees to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions on campus, with the goal of leaving a neutral carbon footprint by 2050, while at the same time providing education to students who will, in turn, help society to do the same. AMERICAN COLLEGE & UNIVERSITY PRESIDENT’S CLIMATE COMMITMENT (ACUPCC) CHARTER SIGNATORY After signing the ACUPCC, UW-Stout:

Bike lockers were added in 2018 for students and employees to help promote all-year bike riding.

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MEASURING AND UNDERSTANDING UW-STOUT’S GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS

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GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS INVENTORY

UW-STOUT’S GHG EMISSIONS BY YEAR

UW-Stout regularly completes a comprehensive Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Inventory. The Sustainability Office collects greenhouse gas data points from various campus departments, and works with UW-Stout’s Applied Research Center (ARC) to do a commuter survey of students, faculty, and staff to gather data on our campus GHG emissions associated with travel. We then calculate our GHG emissions data using Sustainability Indicator Management & Analysis Platform (SIMAP). SIMAP is a carbon and nitrogen-accounting platform that tracks and analyzes campus-wide sustainability efforts. UW-Stout began using it in 2015, as a replacement to the Campus Carbon Calculator 1 . SIMAP measures GHG emissions in three scopes, detailed below.

The following are UW-Stout’s GHG emissions from FY2007 2 to FY2018.

Fiscal year

Scope 1 (Measured in MTCDE 3 ) 11,957.60 12,323.50 12,079.00 11,823.80 13,694.30 12,971.00 12,597.26 11,111.22 10,555.65 10,629.17 10,636.87

Scope 2 (Measured in MTCDE)

Scope 3 (Measured in MTCDE)

Total

36,037.20 36,477.20 34,156.40 39,909.60 36,226.30 30,997.00 32,643.71 32,588.61 31,966.58 30,583.68 32,654.06

2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

12,190.50 11,889.10 11,929.20 12,224.50

12,950.90

9,126.50

17,503.10 10,582.70

SCOPE 1

SCOPE 3

13,308.40 12,778.00 14,391.58 16,207.06 15,254.05 14,408.56 14,361.52

9,223.60 5,248.00 5,654.87 5,270.33 6,156.88 5,545.95 7,655.67

On-Campus Stationary Sources: Includes renewable energy, natural gas, coal, and oil

Faculty and Staff Commuting

Air Travel: Includes faculty, staff, students, and study abroad air travel

Direct Transportation Sources: Includes fleet gasoline and fleet diesel

Personal Vehicle Mileage Reimbursement

Refrigerants & Chemicals: Includes HFCs, HCFCs, and other refrigerants

Solid Waste

Agriculture Sources: Includes synthetic and organic fertilizer

Wastewater

* No GHG Emissions Inventory was conducted in FY2012

Purchased Paper

SCOPE 2

Purchased Electricity

SCOPE 1

SCOPE 2

SCOPE 3

Purchased Renewable Energy

1 CCC was a tool to help organizations determine how much they are contributing to global climate change, and how they could better manage their GHG emissions. The CCC was originally developed by Clean Air/Cool Planet and the Sustainability Institute at University of New Hampshire.

2 UW-Stout’s fiscal year is from July 1-June 30. For example, FY2007 is July 1, 2006-June 30, 2007. 3 Metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent

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2018 EMISSIONS

The following graph illustrates UW-Stout’s total greenhouse gas emissions from FY2007-2018.

Below is a breakdown of our emissions from FY2018, to demonstrate the make-up of our total campus emissions.

UW-Stout’s Total Greenhouse Gas Emissions

45,000.00

40,000.00

44% Purchased Electricity

35,000.00

31.9% On Campus Stationary (Natural Gas Oil, Coal)

30,000.00

25,000.00

11.1% Student Commuting

20,000.00

MTCDE

15,000.00

5.8% Air Travel

10,000.00

2.3% Electricity Transmission & Distribution (T&D) Losses 1.99% Staff Commuting

5,000.00

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

(metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent)

Fiscal Year (No GHG emissions inventory was performed in FY2012

1.16% Faculty Commuting

.69% Work Travel by Vehicle

.582% Fleet Vehicle Travel

.291% Paper Purchased

The graph below shows our campus’ emissions broken down by scope 1, 2, and 3.

.182% Wastewater

UW-Stout’s Scopes 1, 2, and 3 Greenhouse Gas Emissions

.083% Fertilizer

20,000.00 18,000.00 16,000.00 14,000.00 12,000.00 10,000.00 8,000.00

MTCDE

6,000.00

4,000.00 2,000.00

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

(metric tons carbon dioxide equivalent)

Fiscal Year (No GHG emissions inventory was performed in FY2012)

Scope 1

Scope 2

Scope 3

SCOPE 1

SCOPE 2

SCOPE 3

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UNDERSTANDING OUR GHG EMISSIONS

When we talk about “metric tons of carbon dioxide equivalent” it can be difficult to wrap our heads around the size of our campus’ emissions. This is where the Environmental Protection Agency’s Greenhouse Gas Equivalencies Calculator 4 can help. According to this calculator, UW-Stout’s FY2018 GHG emissions are equivalent to the emissions from:

8,614 miles

79,838,778 Miles driven by an average passenger vehicle. This is close to the number of miles expended if every UW-Stout student drove the perimeter of the continental U.S.

2020 GHG EMISSIONS REDUCTION TARGETS

During 2015-2016, UW-Stout’s Sustainability Steering Committee made recommendations for new greenhouse gas emissions targets to be achieved by 2020, aligning with UW-Stout’s FOCUS 2020 Goals. These were approved by UW-Stout’s Strategic Planning Group.

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Scope

FY2015 GHG Emissions Data (Benchmark Year) Measured in MTCDE

2020 GHG Emissions Reduction Commitment (from 2015-2020)

FY2020 GHG Emissions Targets Measured in MTCDE

FY2018 Emissions

Another way of looking at our emissions is what it would take for them to be avoided. Our FY2018 emissions could be avoided by:

Scope 1 Scope 2 Scope 3

11,000 14,586

10,637 14,362

11,111 16,207

1%

10%

6.9 wind turbines running for a year

4,743 - 4,480

7,656

5,270

10-15%

SCOPE 1

SCOPE 2

SCOPE 3

To sequester our greenhouse gas emissions, it would take 38,431 acres of U.S. forest in one year. For comparison, the City of Menomonie is 9,901 acres. To sequester UW-Stout’s FY2018 greenhouse gas emissions, it would take U.S. forest in the size of 3.9 times the city of Menomonie.

4 https://www.epa.gov/energy/greenhouse-gas-equivalencies-calculator

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MITIGATION INITIATIVES UW-STOUT HAS EMPLOYED 2009-2018

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BREAKING DOWN UW-STOUT’S ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND GOALS

Sustainability is more than just planting trees and recycling. UW-Stout has worked to improve sustainability across campus through initiatives which have already been implemented, and others which will begin in the years to come. These initiatives can be broken down into the following 8 categories which will be covered in the next sections:

Initiatives have been broken down into 3 subcategories:

1. PLANNING, DESIGN, AND DEVELOPMENT

The specific tools or initiatives implemented, such as new policies, management tools, and programs.

BUILDINGS AND ENERGY All initiatives related to reducing energy consumption and improving campus buildings.

LANDSCAPING

TRANSPORTATION

WATER

Initiatives focusing on grounds keeping, storm water management, plants, and biodiversity on campus.

Initiatives to promote sustainable transportation options such as walking, biking, carpooling, and public transit.

Initiatives to reduce water consumption on campus and increase awareness of water usage.

2. EDUCATION AND TRAINING

How students learn about sustainable initiatives on campus. This could include informational plaques, training sessions, or general promotional materials.

PROCUREMENT

WASTE

FOOD

CURRICULUM

3. MANAGEMENT

Initiatives to ensure sustainable sourcing of supplies and equipment across campus.

Initiatives to reduce waste and make recycling and composting more accessible to students and employees.

Initiatives to promote sustainable food in dining facilities and our campus garden.

Initiatives to improve sustainability education research for our students and faculty.

Ensuring that sustainability initiatives are properly executed and remain relevant, as well as staying up-to-date on new tools that could be used to improve campus sustainability.

The Stout Student Association’s Green Fee funded the Memorial Student Center’s sustainability wall to help educate students, employees, and visitors about sustainability.

Bike fix stations can be found all over campus to help promote bike riding.

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WHAT WE’VE ACCOMPLISHED

Since the 2009 Climate Action Plan, we have done a lot to push the sustainability needle on our campus. Here are the sustainability initiatives we’ve implemented to help mitigate our GHG emissions.

BUILDINGS AND ENERGY INITIATIVES

Implemented free access to Stout Route Campus Bus and Community Bus for students, faculty, and staff

Building Dashboard electricity module implemented to showcase real-time electricity use for all campus buildings Light sensors and energy efficient lighting in some buildings

Implemented bike shelter at the library

Bike lockers offered by University Housing

Implemented incentive programs for employees to walk, bike, or carpool to work Created a student transportation coordinator position within the Sustainability Office to help coordinate transportation programs Achieved bronze level “Bike Friendly University” designation from the League of American Bicyclists

Pilot project for solar walkway lights

Installing variable frequency drives in certain locations to conserve energy

LANDSCAPING INITIATIVES

Stormwater management projects in parking lots

Added 4 bike fix stations across campus

Campus Exteriors Development Committee incorporates some sustainability projects into campus landscapes and works with Sustainability Minor capstone students

UW-Stout partnered with Dunn County Transit to offer free bus services to students and staff in 2011.

Implemented live bus tracker for riders to know where bus is in real-time

Natural Areas Club student organization formed

WATER INITIATIVES

Annual campus clean-ups performed by Athletics and GreenSense UW-Sprout Campus Garden, which utilizes sustainable growing methods for vegetables, fruits, and herbs, was established

Implemented touchless faucets in some restrooms to minimize water use Implemented water conserving dishwashers in University Dining Services (UDS)

WASTE INITIATIVES

Surplus program for reusing campus-purchased items Paperless initiative to reduce the use of paper across the campus Training for incoming first-year students on how to compost and recycle Created administrative procedure 047 for waste reduction Offer SPRING MOVE-OUT recycling and reuse event for all students every spring Provided outdoor recycling bins funded by Green Fee and University Housing

Implemented a comprehensive waste reduction system for campus with campus-wide composting and recycling Tracking waste, recycling, and trash data on a monthly basis Implemented additional recycling programs for batteries, plastic bags/films, personal electronics, books, video games, and more Implemented I LOVE TAP WATER campaign to reduce single use water bottles

TRANSPORTATION INITIATIVES

PROCUREMENT INITIATIVES

Implemented StoutBikes Bikeshare Program within Stout Adventures

Requires the purchase Energy Star Certified products whenever the option is available

Implemented UW-Stout Rideshare

Participating in RecycleMania program annually

A glimpse of the Waste Management MRF (materials recovery facility) where our campus recycling is sorted.

Placed #1 in UW System from 2014-2018, and placed #2 in 2019. Placed #20-40 nation wide

Recycling fryer oil in UDS

Discount for refillable beverage containers from UDS

All to-go packaging for food prepared by UDS is compostable

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CURRICULUM INITIATIVES

Minor in Sustainability

Online, collaborative B.S. and M.S. degrees in Sustainable Management A campus-recognized definition of “Sustainability in the Curriculum” adopted by Faculty Senate, Senate of Academic Staff, and the Stout Student Association Created a summary of action plans from the “Infusing Sustainability into Curriculum” conference and incorporated into a SACN position paper Created a pilot position for an Academic Sustainability liaison who reports to the Provost

FOOD INITIATIVES UW-Sprout Campus Garden

Developed a market garden with community supported agriculture (CSA) shares for faculty, staff, and students Developed the Volunteers for Veggies program to offer free produce to students who volunteer in the garden

Developed partnerships with:

Faculty/academic staff, to utilize the garden

Stepping Stones Food Pantry to donate food

Created Just Food student organization to educate and promote sustainable food City of Menomonie to utilize landscaping and compost materials

University Dining Service

The Sustainability Office has performed two sustainable food assessments for UDS, to include in the AASHE Sustainability Tracking, Assessment, and Ratings System (STARS) evaluation. “Sustainable Food” was defined using the STARS Version 1.4 definition: Food that is grown and processed within 250 miles of UW-Stout and food that is third-party certified, such as organic or Fair Trade. In 2016, UDS began offering a Green Catering Menu for catered events held on campus. This was in conjunction with the Green Event Certification Program created by the Sustainability Office. In 2013, UDS sourced 16.10% sustainable food In 2011, UDS sourced 16.14% sustainable food

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In 2017, Stout Student Association’s Green Fee funded UW-Stout’s first solar panel project, 10.8 kW on Price Commons.

FUTURE MITIGATION STRATEGIES

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We have many sustainability initiatives yet to accomplish. The Sustainability Steering Committee recommends the following strategies to mitigate our GHG emissions. WHAT’S NEXT

BUILDING AND ENERGY STRATEGIES

Provide plug-in energy meters by office, to allow staff to see their individual energy use Require a regular building managers’ energy report to update occupants of each building on their electricity use Provide power strips to new employees to reduce standby power consumption, which according to the U.S. Department of Energy is responsible for 10% or more of the monthly utility bill Develop building-level strategies for sharing refrigerators, microwaves, and other personal appliances Develop an administrative procedure for personal appliance usage, including space heaters, personal refrigerators, and aquariums Create a Certified Energy Manager position in Facilities Management to coordinate energy efficiency and conservation programs Update Building Manager Policy (82.33) to include sustainability considerations Reappoint Building Managers who have more time to dedicate to building management and sustainability initiatives, then communicate to campus who the building managers are and what they are responsible for Develop a building scheduling process that prioritizes buildings with sensors Allow EMS Campus permissions to all students, faculty, and staff

PLANNING, DESIGN, AND DEVELOPMENT System Policy

Develop a process/checklist for incorporating sustainability elements into all renovations and new construction, including:

Building and Energy Projects

Close offices during holiday breaks and relocate employees to different buildings if they want to work Utilize performance contracting to fund energy efficiency and conservation projects on campus

Work to change UW System policy for payment of energy bills, to allow individual campuses to pay their own energy bills, which would give each campus financial incentive to do energy conservation and efficiency projects Work with Division of Facilities Development (DFD) to change the master specifications for new construction and renovation, to be able to choose architects with LEED credentials and portfolios Partner with architects who have LEED credentials and/or experience Include a specification requesting that architects show that they have done LEED projects or sustainable design projects previously Utilize Focus on Energy (FOE) program for all renovation and new construction projects Implement Administrative Procedure 064 for applying for FOE incentives Go after both custom and prescriptive FOE incentives by working closely with our FOE representative Work closely with our architects to ensure that FOE will be used and make them responsible for the FOE process as our “Trade Ally”

Focus on Energy – both custom and prescriptive incentives

Candidate for LEED certification Phantom power light switches Work rooms for community appliances (e.g., refrigerators, microwaves, coffee makers, etc.) Better accessibility of staircases Other LEED/green building components Reducing, reusing, and recycling demolition waste on all projects Occupancy sensors

Implement renewable energy projects when feasible

Green roof

Implement green roofs when feasible

Renewable energy

Replace interior and exterior lighting with LED or other energy efficient lighting fixtures

LED Lighting

Watersense certified faucets, shower heads, toilets, and urinals

Increase presence of motion sensor lights

Renovations and New Construction

Convert all buildings to direct digital controls

MANAGEMENT

Increase variable frequency drives (VFDs) within buildings to reduce energy spikes Add heating, cooling, and water modules to our Lucid Building Dashboard Ensure that Facilities Management is using the Lucid Building Dashboard to help track and evaluate electricity use by building Provide training to Facilities Management for Focus on Energy program Provide training to Facilities Management in energy management and green building practices like LEED Provide training to Facilities Management for the Lucid Building Dashboard Use the MSC Sustainability Kiosk as a touch point for building and energy initiatives Advertise our green building initiatives as part of recruitment process Increase communication of energy and green building practices around campus and energy social norming campaigns

Dual flush toilets

Lighting sensors

Daylight harvesting

Gray water systems

Alternative building materials

EDUCATION AND TRAINING

Research Events to HVAC software to do universal scheduling that is tied to door locks, lights, and HVAC Surplus and/or recycle building demolition waste during renovations

Market this process to the campus

Implement green cleaning products in Housing and Student Center

Provide sustainability training to Building Managers

Develop a green office certification program with dedicated sustainability ambassadors in each office

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LANDSCAPE STRATEGIES

MANAGEMENT

Create a goal to work on at least one project each year with students Develop academic partnerships to regularly work with faculty and students on course projects

PLANNING, DESIGN, AND DEVELOPMENT

Native perennials and other sustainable plant selections Xeriscaping – drought resistant plants that limit water usage Develop a process/checklist of guiding principles used when making landscaping decisions including:

Reduce mowing frequency Save seed and propagate plantings from existing gardens Continue to work toward the CEDC’s philosophy for natural landscaping Provide annual updates regarding Landscaping Plan progress Minimize or eliminate the use of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides Incorporate xeriscaping techniques to reduce water consumption Examine where the products that we use for landscaping come from and ensure that they are from companies that emphasize sustainability Work with the City of Menomonie to develop a local composting program for yard waste, food waste, and other compostable items

Determine the status of the Landscape Development Plan (currently cited in the Campus Master Plan) and where the responsibility for this landscaping plan rests Implement test plots with signage for new sustainable landscaping pilot projects (e.g., No Mow grass, natural lawn program, etc.) Offer edible landscapes like fruit trees for campus to utilize Plant native perennials in place of or in addition to annual plants Increase diversity of tree species, preferably native trees Continue to garner campus input for landscaping projects Increase the use of permeable surfaces across campus Determine the status of the Storm Water Management Plan (currently listed as a “Draft”) and ensure that our landscapes are proactively working toward the goals of this plan

How landscapes interact with tours for prospective students Conduct a comprehensive landscaping audit

Rain gardens

Gather feedback on landscaping practices

Organic fertilizers

Informational plaques at native planting areas, gardens, and outdoor spaces Increase use and awareness of the outdoor classroom Increase use and awareness of the UW-Sprout Campus Garden Invest in training and certifications for grounds crew that support sustainable landscape management such as native plant types, pruning, biodiversity, alternative fertilizing methods, burning, grazing, etc. Make the outdoor classroom a draw for our campus by revitalizing the space EDUCATION AND TRAINING

Potential for a classroom project

Create a tree tour program with signage on trees and info about each tree, similar to the UNC Tree Tour Develop a small-scale giving program for alumni to donate funds for trees and plants Develop a program to recognize long-term employees with plant purchases on campus, rather than through buying pins or other products Offer an “Adopt a Plot” program for campus departments to tend to specific outdoor areas

Incorporate landscapes that encourage biodiversity

Assess snow management processes to reduce salt and chemical usage

In 2018, UW-Stout retrofitted 10 campus buildings, parking lots, and sidewalks with LED lights, estimated to save us $89,000 per year in energy costs.

Perennial garden in front of Robert S. Swanson Library and Learning Center. Perennials improve soil structure and use less water.

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TRANSPORTATION STRATEGIES

PLANNING, DESIGN, AND DEVELOPMENT

Develop a campus procedure for clearing snow at bike racks, bike shelters, and bus shelters Offer campus facilities to maintain and repair bikes on campus Evaluate expansion of current staff biking incentives to further increase biking Consider the option of a Bicycle Commuter Benefit using the federal Bicycle Commuter Act, which provides a tax-benefited reimbursement of up to $20/month for the reasonable incurred by employees who commute to work by bike Create a program to make it more convenient for carpoolers to park when they need to drive separately Allow more work schedule flexibility to allow carpoolers to coordinate disparate schedules Continue to pursue the option of offering vanpools from neighboring communities Consider extending staff carpooler incentives to staff who carpool with non-Stout employees or Stout students

Develop an online transportation portal showcasing the full range of transportation options rather than the current yearly parking permit default Create a Sustainable Transportation Manager position to coordinate all alternative transportation options Develop a pro-rated parking pass system that facilitates and encourages occasional and limited commuting by car Develop quality bike commuting infrastructure including: Campus bike paths designated with spray- painted lines and signage Bike parking options including campus bike racks that are maintained in the winters, bike shelters, bike lockers, and indoor bike storage Work with City of Menomonie and community groups to develop and maintain bike paths and dedicated bike routes on city streets

The Stout Student Association’s Green Fee helps implement bike infrastructure like this bike shelter.

EDUCATION AND TRAINING

Explore the possibility of support for students commuting home by bus (e.g., voucher to offset ticket price) Investigate the option of a weekend shuttle bus to the Twin Cities area

Organize bike safety classes for students and employees

Offer a regularly scheduled bike repair clinic

Develop workshops and programming with local bike shops and student organizations to promote bike maintenance, tune-up, and repair Continue to support and market the Badger Bus Lines service, Jefferson Bus Lines service, and Chippewa Valley Airport Bus service Evaluate and consider expansion of the current staff walking incentive program with the goal of increasing staff walk commuting Create a bikeshare program that allows for students and employees to check out bikes from kiosks around campus and ride them for short periods of time Consider a bike donation program where graduating students may donate bikes to new students Work with Dunn County Transit to expand and improve bus routes

Develop a program for travel-related carbon offsets for:

On-campus parking permits

University fleet travel

Air travel

Study abroad travel

MANAGEMENT

Develop a fleet vehicle matching system whereby university employees traveling to common state locations can carpool in one vehicle Encourage the use of technology to facilitate virtual meetings to reduce travel

Encourage and incorporate more sustainable vehicles Install electric vehicle charging stations

Establish permit discount for electric vehicles

Transition university maintenance vehicle fleet to electric vehicles Explore the option of transitioning some of the university off-campus fleet to hybrid vehicles

In 2016, UW-Stout was recognized as a bronze level Bike Friendly University by the League of American Bicyclists.

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WATER STRATEGIES

PLANNING, DESIGN, AND DEVELOPMENT

For landscaping, implement the following practices: Employ xeriscaping techniques that use drought resistant, native plants Choose high maintenance grasses and plants sparingly

Conduct an audit to measure water use indoors and outdoors on campus Create an inventory of water use fixtures, faucets, spigots, etc. Determine which buildings and locations are: High flow areas: where water is used more frequently and have fewer issues with water quality Low flow areas: where water is used less frequently, having more issues with water quality and thus a need to increase water consumption Regularly track water consumption data based on meter readings After audit has been completed, modify or replace existing equipment to conserve water After audit has been completed, develop an operating procedure for water use and conservation Consider purchase of temporary strap-on flow meters that use ultrasonic waves

Amend soil with compost and use mulch to retain water and minimize irrigation

Irrigate in the morning to minimize evaporation

Use timers to avoid overuse of water

Use rain sensors to avoid overuse of water

Install Watersense certified toilets, faucets, urinals, and showerheads, as well as other water efficient fixtures as follows: Install Watersense certified landscape irrigation controllers

MANAGEMENT

EDUCATION AND TRAINING

Investigate replacing water-cooled equipment with air- cooled equipment when possible. When replacing out-of-date equipment that uses water, replace with Watersense certified fixtures Add water conserving equipment to fixtures in our residence hall showers

Add water module for most or all campus buildings to the Building Dashboard to continually measure and showcase water use across campus

Waterless urinals

Faucet aerators for sinks in high-flow buildings

Dual flush toilets/ valves Sensor operated faucets

Train campus in how to report water leaks

Offer shower heads with an LED light that shows how many gallons used during shower Provide marketing and education with regard to water consumption Implement signage to explain why we’re doing water efficiency measures

Install water-saving devices

Research code requirements for converting restroom sinks to cold water only Implement water efficient hard floor cleaning equipment campus-wide

Meters and sub-meters

Evaluate waterless alternatives to current systems For high flow areas, install flow restrictions to reduce water pressure when it is too high Purchase low-water consuming washing machines for buildings with laundry facilities

In 2012, UW-Stout established the Campus-Wide Energy Committee to work on energy efficiency and conservation measures.

The UW-Sprout campus garden was established in 2014, and began selling vegetables to campus customers in 2015.

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WASTE STRATEGIES

PROCUREMENT STRATEGIES

MANAGEMENT

PLANNING, DESIGN, AND DEVELOPMENT

PLANNING, DESIGN, AND DEVELOPMENT

Audit campus buildings to make sure they are in compliance with Recycling Administrative Procedure 047 Ensure that our Surplus Department is recycling all e-waste with an E-Cycle Wisconsin Registered Recycler Encourage shared coffee makers, but discourage the use of Keurig coffee makers Make UDS’ Green to Go program easier to use Use an electronic process with Campus Card rather than a paper receipt Develop a program within UDS to offer compostable plates, cups, utensils, and napkins for purchase by departments/offices and individual employees to buy for on-campus meetings and parties Work with UDS to offer compostable concessions at sporting events Work with Corner 3 (Quantity Food Production) to offer compostable to-go containers rather than Styrofoam Offer a yearly clean-out event for academic and administrative buildings to recycle items and shred paper Work with IT to develop a plan that sets all campus printers to default to double-sided printing Work with campus departments to re-use printed material as scratch/note paper Encourage departments and individuals to track their printing use and compare over time Ensure that UDS is making reusable dinnerware and utensils the default option in all dining locations, rather than single-use options Work with Fashion Without Fabric event to implement the use of recycled materials Offer it in all UDS dining locations

Develop and implement a tool to track all waste from campus in addition to our trash, recycling, compost weights (e.g., batteries, light bulbs, e-waste, etc.) Develop an administrative procedure for reusing and recycling of demolition waste for all renovation projects Track weights for demolition waste -- landfilled, recycled, reused, sold through Surplus -- for each project within facilities management Provide outdoor recycling collection at all trash bins location Reduce paper use within academic courses by no longer providing paper handouts

Work with UW System to develop and implement a procurement process that prioritizes sustainability Work with our Procurement Department to purchase paper that is 100% recycled uncoated freesheet, rather than 30% recycled Create a process for purchasing clothing/uniforms for staff members that prioritizes sustainable apparel Encourage departments to purchase rechargeable batteries and rechargeable equipment, rather than single-use batteries and equipment Investigate the purchasing of electric vehicle charging stations Determine a system for charging students, faculty, and staff for utilizing EV charging stations Investigate the purchasing of carbon offsets for all university travel

Work with the City and County to develop a composting operation in the community

Research and develop a software program (e.g. Papercut) for measuring paper printing in areas with unlimited printing (e.g. residence halls) Develop an on-campus recycling sort system with student employees sorting recycling

EDUCATION AND TRAINING

Develop sustainability and life cycle guidelines for departments to follow when purchasing items Continue to make all purchasing agents aware of the Focus on Energy incentives

EDUCATION AND TRAINING

Develop and offer a comprehensive training program for recycling/composting to custodial staff Continue training for recycling/composting to new students in residence halls Offer training for recycling/composting to new employees Develop a 5-year plan to incorporate universal recycling, composting, and trash bins campus-wide Increased promotion of UDS’ Green to Go program and refillable beverage container discount program Educate campus departments regarding the purpose of paper reduction policies to encourage student/ staff cooperation

MANAGEMENT

When replacing appliances, prioritize Energy Star®certified equipment or any other recognized standard/certification for energy efficiency When replacing water fixtures, prioritize Watersense certified equipment or any other recognized standard/certification for water conservation, where applicable Ensure that our waste contract provides for accurate reporting of waste weight data Prioritize purchasing organic fertilizer over synthetic fertilizer Separate compost, recycling, and trash contracts in next bid process for waste vendors to allow for more options for each waste stream

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FOOD STRATEGIES

PLANNING, DESIGN, AND DEVELOPMENT

WHAT IS SUSTAINABLE FOOD?

Ensure that UDS adopts a definition of local and community-based food in accordance with the AASHE STARS 5 definition Utilize the Real Food Calculator 6 , which accounts for all the sustainable food options detailed above Track local and community-based and third party verified (to be ecologically sound, fair and/or humane) food purchases each year Make this annual percentage of local and third- party certified food purchases available to the campus Develop goals to increase this percentage each year (e.g., increase by 2% each year) Offer diverse, complete-protein vegetarian and vegan options at all meals Develop and implement specific annual protein assessments for: Work to ensure that conventionally produced animal products comprise less than 30% of UDS’ total food purchases (per AASHE STARS) Develop a UDS student sustainability position to measure and manage sustainable food efforts and act as liaison with UW-Sprout Campus Garden Look at developing new markets for UW-Sprout Campus Garden Conventionally produced animal products vs. sustainably produced animal products Complete-protein vegetarian and vegan options

Food that is sourced from local community- based producers (grown and processed within 250 miles) directly or through distributors The Association for the Advancement of sustainability in Higher Education’s (AASHE) Sustainability Tracking, Assessment, and Rating System (STARS) offers this definition for “local and community based food”:

OR

Contain raw ingredients that are third-party certified and/or locally harvested and produced

In 2011, UW-Stout created an administrative procedure for waste reduction, allowing for campus-wide composting and recycling.

AND

Exclude products from Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations (CAFOs), products with minimal nutritional value, and products from producers that have been convicted of one or more labor law violations within the previous three years.

EDUCATION AND TRAINING

Offer more curriculum and research collaborations between UW-Sprout and students, faculty, and academic staff Dedicated internships with Marketing, Business, Hospitality and Tourism, Environmental Science, Dietetics, and other majors or programs Collaborate with faculty and academic staff who teach courses in which sustainable food and sustainable agriculture could dovetail with curriculum, such as Sustainability Capstone, Environmental Science Capstone, Quantity Food Production, Industrial Design, Engineering, and others

Provide training to all UDS employees with regard to:

Sustainable food

Provide education and/or signage for customers with regard to: Complete-protein vegetarian and vegan options

Sustainable food and offerings

Complete-protein vegetarian and vegan options

Healthy options

Provide internship opportunities for students within UDS (e.g., Dietetics, Sustainability minor, etc.) Offer a Meatless Monday (or Low Impact Dining Monday) campaign Provide outreach programming through the UW-Sprout Campus Garden Canning classes with garden produce through a partnership with UW-Extension’s Master Canner Program Gardening education for children in the Child & Family Study Center Gardening and fresh food workshops (e.g. in partnership with the Peer Health Educators) Health and nutrition education in partnership with UW-Stout’s Dietetics program

Create a plan to expand garden size

MANAGEMENT

Create a proposal to increase budget for student positions, to allow for more students working in the garden and selling food that will eventually make the student positions self-sustaining

UDS and UW-Sprout partnership to offer more local food in UDS facilities

Ingredient swap-out for healthier recipes within UDS

Implement additional hoop house(s) at UW-Sprout for season extension

Implement solar power at the garden

5 The Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) offers the Sustainability Tracking, Assessment, and Rating System (STARS) tool for tracking campus-wide sustainability. UW-Stout has completed this assessment multiple times. More here: https://stars.aashe.org/institutions/university-of-wisconsin-stout-wi/report/ 6 The Real Food Calculator is a tool for tracking institutional food purchasing. It plays a crucial role in helping schools increase their real food purchasing. More here: http://www.realfoodchallenge.org/calculator

Establish a process for allowing students, faculty, and staff to access kitchens on campus (e.g., Heritage Hall kitchens) to offer food-related programming

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In 2011 and 2012, the Faculty Senate, Senate of Academic Staff, and Stout Student Association adopted a campus-recognized definition for “sustainability in the curriculum” including social, economic, and environmental pillars.

CURRICULUM STRATEGIES

EDUCATION AND TRAINING

PLANNING, DESIGN, AND DEVELOPMENT

Develop an ongoing Nakatani Teaching & Learning Center Community of Practice for sustainability and create an incentive for faculty to do this Host sustainability in the curriculum events for UW- Stout faculty/academic staff

Develop a plan to tie sustainability courses to general education requirements, such as social responsibility, ethical reasoning, and sustainability Assess sustainability in the curriculum, via AASHE STARS oor some other tool Link sustainability career readiness with alumni and Foundation Develop a general education requirement for sustainability Develop a proposal to make sustainability work part of the promotion/tenure criteria Develop a list of faculty and instructional staff who are teaching sustainability in the curriculum Gather faculty who are teaching courses within the sustainability minor Within teaching practices, such as reducing paper and using D2L, recycling and reusing materials, etc. Within curriculum, research, and service

Offer sustainability reading groups for faculty/staff

Work with literature committees to focus on sustainability

Work with Honors Colloquium to focus on sustainability

Hold educational seminars and events that include the surrounding community

Sustainability training for faculty and instructional staff

MANAGEMENT

Continue to update list of potential classroom projects and make available on StoutCloud

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APPENDIX 1: SUSTAINABILITY STEERING COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP

UW-Stout adopted its first Climate Action Plan on September 15, 2009. This Climate Action Plan laid out UW-Stout’s targets for reducing its greenhouse gas emissions by 2015. The table below shows UW-Stout’s progress toward the goals it set in 2009. APPENDIX 2: 2015 GHG EMISSIONS REDUCTION TARGETS GHG emissions reduction commitments from the 2009 Climate Action Plan, measured by percent change from FY2008 GHG emissions data to FY2015 GHG emissions data

UW-Stout’s Sustainability Steering Committee developed and authored this plan in 2016-2017 Members include:

Sarah Rykal Chair/Sustainability Manager Sustainability Office Andrew Cleveland Assistant Director Student Life and Services Kennedy Crever SSA Sustainability Director Stout Student Association

Arthur Kneeland Senior Lecturer Biology

Our campus’ GHG emissions data from our baseline year of 2008

Joan Menefee Full Professor English & Philosophy Zenon Smolarek Assistant Director Physical Plant Wendy Stary Professor Engineering Technology

Our campus’ GHG emissions data from benchmark year of 2015

Our actual percent change from 2008 to 2015

Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Emissions Scope

2015 GHG Emissions Reduction Commitment (from 2009 Climate Action Plan)

FY2008 GHG Emissions Data (Baseline Year) Measured in MTCDE

FY2015 GHG Emissions Data (Benchmark Year) Measured in MTCDE

Percent Change from 2008 to 2015

Emma DeRubeis Student Greensense

Laura Donovan Student

Houston Taylor Stout Adventures Coordinator Stout Adventures

Scope 1 Scope 2 Scope 3

5.92% increase 35.86% increase 56.89% decrease 7

1-3%

12,324 11,929 12,225

11,111 16,207

10-20%

3-5%

5,270

Tom Dye Policy & Accreditation Specialist Planning, Assessment, Research & Quality

Ann Vogl Reference/Distance Learning Librarian University Library

Jeremy Janiak Custodial Supervisor Physical Plant

Darrin Witucki Director Student Centers

7 This substantial decrease can, in part, be attributed to a change in travel categories within the Campus Carbon Calculator. In 2008, the CCC required that we survey any students about commuting habits. In 2015, it required that we survey student commuters only.

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UW-STOUT SUSTAINABILITY OFFICE www.uwstout.edu/sustainability

#sustainablestout

@SustainableStout

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