Industry Connections Report | 2019

CONNECT I ONS

CONNECT I ONS

CONTENTS

About this Publication Partner with UW-Stout Expand Your Workforce

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Gain Short-term Assistance Showcase Your Organization Develop Your Team Support Your Future Employees

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LET US CONNECT YOU

ABOUT THIS PUBL ICATION

As a polytechnic university, UW-Stout is driven by our three polytechnic tenets: career focus, applied learning, and collaboration with business, industry, education and other organizational partners. Our high level of collaboration through our extensive network of external partnerships is arguably UW-Stout’s most valued tenet. Partnerships are essential to our hands- on education and the exceptionally high employment rates that span across each of our six career pathways. This publication is designed to serve as a guide for how you can benefit from engaging with UW-Stout in a variety of ways, as well as to showcase a small sampling of our partners. While every university strives to build and maintain partnerships at some level, UW- Stout’s expansive level of focus on this tenet is why our students are so highly desired by employers as both interns and full-time employees. Stout graduates are uniquely ready to meet the needs of employers in many of the most in-demand fields because

our curriculum is guided by advisory committees consisting of external partners. Our partners also ensure that UW-Stout’s experiential learning environments, featuring three times as many labs as classrooms, are up-to-date with current and emerging technologies. In return for this support, partners save thousands of dollars in both recruiting and onboarding costs through the creation of a steady pipeline of highly capable employees who are ready to hit the ground running. Additionally, many of Stout’s partners enjoy the extensive level of outreach services provided by the Discovery Center. As Stout’s primary outreach and engagement organization, this group features skilled problem solvers, gifted learners, and action- oriented colleagues who work together with our partners to overcome hurdles in process improvement, product development, business

growth, continuing education, culture development, applied research, and much more.

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PARTNER WITH UW-STOUT

WAYS TO CONNECT WITH OUR TEAM

RECRUIT OUR STUDENTS OR JOIN AN ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Bryan Barts - Director, Career Services 715.232.1469 | bartsb@uwstout.edu

Career Services is the centralized point of contact for employers looking to recruit at the university through opportunities such as: · Posting professional and co-op/internship positions · On-campus recruitment and interviewing activities · Career Conferences and networking events · Serving on an advisory committee for any of our programs MAXIMIZE YOUR ORGANIZATIONAL OUTCOMES Randy Hulke - Executive Director, Discovery Center 715.232.5024 | hulker@uwstout.edu The Discovery Center is the University of Wisconsin- Stout’s primary outreach and engagement center and assists organizations with: · Business training, professional education programs, conferences and workshops · Strategic business consulting, organizational growth, product development and cost reduction assistance · Conference and event management

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CONNECTIONS 2019

PROVIDE FINANCIAL SUPPORT Michelle Dingwall - Senior Development Officer, Stout University Foundation 715.232.5546 | dingwallm@uwstout.edu

The Stout University Foundation provides a way for organizations to connect with the university through:

· Making financial or in-kind donations for programs · Establishing a scholarship

CONNECT WITH OUR ALUMNI Mesa Covill - Senior Alumni Relations Officer, Alumni Association 715.232.1259 | covillm@uwstout.edu

Our Alumni Association provides external organizations with opportunities to network with our alumni in a variety of ways: · Program reunions and alumni event sponsorship · Facilitation of corporate events · Organizational exposure through news or social media stories featuring alumni

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STOUT AT A GLANCE

AVERAGE STUDENT ENROLLMENT 9,000

MALE STUDENTS 54% GRADUATE STUDENTS 14% MORE LABS THAN CLASSROOMS 3x

FEMALE STUDENTS 46% AVERAGE LECTURE CLASS SIZE 24 STUDENT/FACULTY RATIO 19:1

UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 86% ON-CAMPUS LABORATORIES 235

50 UNDERGRADUATE DEGREES IN OUR 6 CAREER CLUSTERS

SCIENCE ENGINEERING & MATH

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY & COMMUNICATIONS

HUMAN & SOCIAL SCIENCES

ART DESIGN & GRAPHICS

BUSINESS & MANAGEMENT

EDUCATION

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CONNECTIONS 2019

THE POLYTECHNIC BLEND

APPLIED LEARNING

LIBERAL ARTS

• Incorporates tools to evaluate, create, and shape human comprehension • Emphasizes real world and hands-on learning experiences

• Develops critical thinking, complex problem solving, communication and leadership skills

• Introduces students to a variety of disciplines

OUR POLYTECHNIC TENETS

CAREER FOCUS OFFERING A COMPREHENSIVE CURRICULUM THAT PREPARES GRADUATES FOR PROFESSIONAL CAREERS.

APPLIED LEARNING BLENDING THEORY WITH PRACTICE TO PRODUCE INNOVATIVE SOLUTIONS TO REAL-WORLD PROBLEMS.

COLLABORATION WORKING CLOSELY WITH BUSINESS, INDUSTRY AND OTHER EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS TO BENEFIT STUDENTS AND GROW THE ECONOMY.

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EXPAND YOUR WORKFORCE

OPPORTUNITIES FOR HIRING GRADS

UW-Stout Career Services is focused on connecting students and employers. We strive to continuously build on our successes and relationships so that organizations like yours can better build a strong brand on campus, collaborate with faculty and connect with students. We offer a variety of engagement opportunities that will support your corporate strategic recruitment initiatives in increasingly competitive environments including: Career Conference - A two-day recruiting and networking event for employers looking to hire professional and co-op/intern positions from all of the academic programs offered at UW-Stout. Participating employers interact with all levels of students, degreed alumni, staff and faculty. Special Events - The Government and Non-Profit Career Expo is an industry focused event supporting recruitment and careers in local, state and federal government as well as non-profit organizations. Art and Design Week connects the School of Art and Design students with over 100 creative employers, design professionals, and alumni. On Campus Interviews - Employers can conduct on campus one-to-one or group interviews through one of several interview rooms located in Career Services.

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3,800 students participated in Spring and Fall Career Conferences

LARGEST Career Conferences in the Upper Midwest

students participated in on-campus interviews 1,409

the average starting salary for a UW-Stout graduate $44,000

of graduates employed or continuing education 98.7%

employers recruited students at the Career Conferences 871

students received individual career counseling 1,209

31%

55%

TOP 5 STATES WHERE OUR GRADUATES WORK

1.6%

.9%

1.1%

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CONNECTIONS 2019

TOP HIRING COMPANIES FOR UW-STOUT GRAUDATES

54 FORTUNE 500 COMPANIES HIRED UW-STOUT STUDENTS IN 2017/18

3M Abbott Activision Archer Daniels Midland Co. Arconic Best Buy Boston Scientific C.H. Robinson Caterpillar CDW Cigna Cisco Meraki Coca-Cola Enterprises Cummins CVS Health Delta Air Lines Disney Ecolab Foot Locker General Electric Healthcare

General Mills Hilton Honeywell IBM International Paper JC Penney Jones Lang Lasalle

Sherwin-Williams Company Spectrum Brands State Farm Insurance Target Thrivent Financial TJX Companies Tractor Supply Co. United Health Group US Bank Verizon Communications Walmart Stores Walt Disney World Wells Fargo Home Mortgage Xcel Energy

Kimberly-Clark Corporation Kohl’s Department Stores Kraft Heinz Company Lockheed Martin Macy’s Marriott Maurices (Ascena Retail Group)

Northwestern Mutual Oshkosh Corporation Polaris Industries Rockwell Automation RR Donnelley Securian Financial Group

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CONNECTIONS 2019

SHOWCASE: CAMPUS-CORPORATE CONNECT ION

In its 72nd year, Greenheck corporation is an unqualified success. The nation’s leading manufacturer of nonresidential air movement, control and conditioning products is headquartered in Schofield, in central Wisconsin, and employs 3,700 people in seven states and two foreign countries. Greenheck was selected in 2016, 2012 and 2004 as Wisconsin Manufacturer of the Year for the state’s largest corporations. At least part of Greenheck’s success can be attributed to another long history — of working closely with UW-Stout. The company has supported the university’s programs and students. In return it has benefited by hiring many of UW-Stout’s career-ready graduates. “We are so fortunate to have UW-Stout right between two of our major locations, Schofield and Minneapolis. We now have 80 UW-Stout alumni in our workforce, and through the years many have grown into key leadership positions,” said Jim McIntyre, president and CEO.

The Greenheck Stout alumni include: • Mark Belke, 1996 graduate, general manager of industrial fan business unit • Jeff Lamer, 1984 graduate, director of manufacturing excellence • Beth Brinkmann, 1992 graduate, human resources manager Brinkman recruits at UW-Stout. She is proud to see many students join the company with a co-op or internship, then continue full time after graduation. “I know the high quality of the education,” she said. The corporate-campus connection goes right to the top. Alumni at Greenheck include the chairman of the board and former CEO Dwight Davis and his spouse, Linda, 1966 and 1967 graduates, respectively. The couple annually supports several scholarships for UW-Stout students. In 2009 they established an endowment for transformational leadership, enabling the university to carry out initiatives to maintain education excellence and relevancy.

UW-Stout alumni Jeff Lamer, left, and Mark Belke work at Greenheck corporation

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CONNECTIONS 2019

SCHOWCASE: PARKER HANNIFIN PROVIDES INTERVIEW TRANSPORTAT ION

Par ker Hann i f i n, a wor l dwi de company wi th faci li t i es i n Wi sconsi n and Mi nnesota, made sure that UW-Stout students had a chance to get on the bus to Inter nsh i p Draf t Day i n November 2018. The company, wh i ch spec i a l i zes i n mot i on cont ro l techno log i es, prov i ded the bus. About 25 students f rom UW-Stout were p i cked up on campus and taken to the event about three hour s away at Lambeau F i e l d i n Green Bay. Par ker Hann i f i n a l so prov i ded a company tour and l unch. At Inter nsh i p Draf t Day, students v i ed for 300- p l us pa i d inter nsh i ps and co - ops be i ng of fered by about 60 compan i es f rom the Nor theast Wi sconsi n Manufactur i ng Al l i ance.

“The char ter bus i s an i nd i cat i on of the va l ue that Par ker, the Nor theast Wi scons i n Manufactur i ng Al l i ance and the Nor theast Wi scons in Educat i ona l Resource A l l i ance puts on UW-Stout and i ts po l y techn i c educat i on,” sa i d Br yan Bar ts, UW-Stout d i rector of Career Ser v i ces. NEWMA Di rector Ann Franz sa i d compan ies prov i de buses to the event because they “ recogn i ze i n order to meet the i r wor kforce needs they need to engage co l l ege students.” One of the UW-Stout students, Aust i n Wheaton, rece i ved a $1,500 scho l ar sh i p af ter be i ng named the top draf t p i ck of the event . The award was presented by Mar k Mur phy, Green Bay Packer s CEO.

UW-Stout students and staff during Internship Draft Day at Lambeau Field.

CONNECTIONS 2019

SHOWCASE: AN ‘ INCREDIBLE’ CO-OP EXPERIENCE

In an i dea l wor l d, co l l ege students wou l d t r y out the ir career f ie l d i n a profess i ona l set ti ng before they graduate. Even bet ter, they wou l d get pa i d, ear n academi c credi t and boost the i r resume. That i dea l wor l d ex i sts through UW- Stout ’s co - op program. Consi der Ryan Knudtson. As a j un i or packag i ng ma j or, he l anded a co - op at Johnsonv i l l e, the Wiscons i n sausage company. He wor ked for seven months wi th Johnsonv i l l e’s packag i ng eng i neer s and was exposed to many other aspects of the operat i on, i nc l ud i ng mar ket i ng , product deve l opment and purchas i ng .

“ I wor ked wi th so many teams and i nd i v i dua l s. I saw how packag i ng af fected ever y th i ng ,” Knudtson sa i d. He ca l l ed i t “an i ncred i b l e exper i ence” that reaf f i rmed he was on the r i ght career path. A year l ater when he graduated, Knudtson was career - ready and accepted a j ob of fer f rom Genera l Mi l l s i n Mi nneapo l i s as a packag i ng eng i neer. Hi s successfu l co - op exper i ence a l so l ed to the nat i onal Cooperat i ve Educat i on Student Ach i evement award.

Ryan Knudtson, center, receives his national co-op award with, from left, Bryan Barts, Career Services director; Tracey Lord, Cooperative Education and Internship Association; Bethany Henthorn, UW-Stout co-op program coordinator; and Doug Church, packaging engineer at Johnsonville.

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EXPERIENCE THE BENEFITS OF OUR EXPERIENTIAL LEARNING

OUR MISSION IN PRACTICE

As a polytechnic university, UW-Stout is committed to ensuring that students learn through applied or “hands-on” experiences. That’s why they are infused into the curriculum of every major and 95.8% of our students graduate having completed at least one of these experiences:

Capstone: Complete an advanced intellectual final project individually or with a group. Cooperative Education (Co-Op)/Internship: Serve as an employee of an organization. Field Experience: Apply a practical, professional experience in a short-term, real-world setting. Research: Conduct a project that address a disciplinary societal or industry need. Service-Learning: Provide community-based service to realize academic and professional goals. Student Teaching: Teach with increasing responsibility over time.

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CONNECTIONS 2019

SHOWCASE: FOOD SCIENCE MAJOR ENJOYS SUMMER INTERNSHIP IN I TALY

Samantha Bibbs developed a new perspective on coffee, mushrooms, her field of study and the world — all thanks to a few months abroad. A food science and technology major, she interned with a sustainably-focused food company, Funghi Espresso, which grows mushrooms using coffee grounds. Bibbs’ internship came with a bonus: It was in Florence, Italy, through UW-Stout’s Office of International Education. In Florence she took two classes, one on the culture of business in Italy that coincided with her internship class. The experience included living in Florence with other students from around the U.S. while also visiting cities throughout Italy. At Funghi Espresso she experimented with growing mycelium, tubular filaments that develop into mushrooms. The company would prefer to grow mycelium rather than buy it to reduce expenses, she said. Funghi Espresso gets the used coffee grounds for free; employees on bikes collect them from restaurants, cafes and coffee

shops. The coffee grounds are inoculated with mycelium and left in the dark for 20 days before being exposed to light to finish the growing process. Funghi Espresso is part of the so-called blue economy, creating something from a waste product while minimizing environmental impact. Waste from the mushroom production process is composted and then used to grow organic vegetables. Bibbs conducted experiments on mycelium, using knowledge from her microbiology class at UW-Stout. She knew how to make her own petri dishes and create the proper environment for growth. Seeing a sustainable food system in operation reaffirmed what Bibbs was learning at UW-Stout. “This experience has given me a taste of international business. In order to be successful, you need to think outside the box to come up with a creative solution to a real- life problem,” she said.

Samantha Bibbs visits the Leaning Tower of Pisa in Pisa, Italy, during her summer studying and interning in the country.

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GAIN SHORT-TERM ASSISTANCE

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION

Cooperative Education at UW-Stout is part of a nationwide university initiative that integrates career-related work experience with academic coursework. Our Career Services office coordinates with academic departments of the university to create successful co-op experiences. The co-op program supports UW-Stout’s polytechnic designation by providing students the opportunity to experience an active and applied focus on learning in their professional fields, and provides employers with exceptional temporary assistance. Over 30% of co-op employers offer students permanent positions upon graduation.

UW-Stout’s successful co-op program is based on our framework of collaborative partnerships with businesses like yours.

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Golf enterprise management student, Drew Ringelstetter, interns at Sand Valley Golf Resort.

CONNECTIONS 2019

TOP CO-OP HIRING COMPANIES FOR UW-STOUT STUDENTS

600+

COMPANIES PARTICIPATE IN THE CO-OP PROGRAM

1,058

STUDENTS PART ICIPATED LAST YEAR

$15.50 AVERAGE HOURLY CO-OP WAGE 30% CONVERSION FROM CO-OP TO PERMANENT HIRES

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SHOWCASE YOUR BUSINESS

SPEAKING AND ON-SITE PROMOTIONAL OPPORTUNITIES

Todd Wanek, president and CEO of Ashley Furniture, spoke at UW-Stout in 2017 as part of the Cabot Executive in Residence program. The 1988 graduate in industrial technology — now engineering technology — toured campus and labs before explaining how Ashley has grown from one plant in 1970 to becoming the largest furniture manufacturer in the world, with sales of more than $5 billion annually. “Technology is our biggest challenge (in industry). We’re evolving into a tech company,” he said. Diversity : UW-Stout’s Diversity Speaker Series focuses on emerging and culturally sensitive topics. Business : The Cabot Executive in Residence program for more than 30 years has featured a business executive who gives a public address, visits classes and meets with faculty and staff. Science : The Applied Science Speaker Series showcases professionals from various hard science fields, discussing their work and research interests. Education : The Career and Technical Education in Residence program annually hosts an education executive in the area of workforce training and development. Art and Design : Practicing artists and executives visit campus to discuss their work.

Businesses of all sizes are facing a growing need for specialized talent. Those that have the deepest engagement and strongest brand on campus are the most successful recruiters. Engagement opportunities include involvement in and support of the classroom experience. From CEOs to scientists, educators to artists, UW-Stout welcomes experts to speak on campus. The university hosts many professionals throughout the year for classroom and other special presentations, as well as public speaker series in a variety of professional areas including:

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CONNECTIONS 2019

SHOWCASE: SPOTL IGHT ON CLASSROOM CONNECT IONS

When outside speakers enter our classrooms, they engage our faculty, staff and student leaders in solving the dynamic challenges of industry and society. Examples of these types of engagements include: Students majoring in computer networking and information technology were part of a capstone class in which they were assigned a problem that a company needed solved. Students were divided into five teams and worked with Dell, Heartland Business Systems, Marshfield Clinic, Menards and Target. The student-company collaborations included weekly updates, a white paper report, a live demo of a solution and a final presentation to company officials. Some of the students were simultaneously interning at the five companies. Meg Floersch and Tyler Vucinovich grew up in the Twin Cities, where they shopped often at Target, the nation’s second-largest retailer based in downtown Minneapolis. After they left the metro area, however, and went 75 miles east to study apparel design and development at UW-Stout, they found themselves closer to Target than they’ve ever been: inside the company’s headquarters. Recently, Professor Jongeun Rhee organized a contest in the class Computer Aided Design for Fashion. Target’s textile development team provide guidance and feedback

Professionals from WESTconsin Credit Union based in Menomonie presented four lectures in a general education Financial Wellness class. “We have employees who are passionate about helping others, so many of them jump at the chance to present financial wellness topics,” said Lora Benrud, WESTconsin CEO.

Chelse Cockeram, of WESTconsin Credit Union in Menomonie, presents information about identity theft and fraud to students.

SHOWCASE: A DAY WI TH TARGET DESIGNERS

to students. At the end of the class, two Target designers came to campus to judge the students’ work. Floersch and Vucinovich came out on top and earned the chance to spend a day job- shadowing professional designers. The entire contest was educational, Floersch and Vucinovich said. The chance to go to Target and see designers at work gave them priceless insight into their career field. “It was great seeing the entire design process come together. It was an inspiration,” Floersch said.

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CONNECTIONS 2019

SHOWCASE: INDUSTRIAL DESIGN MAJORS DEVELOP PRODUCT IDEAS

Industrial design seniors at UW-Stout learned firsthand what life as a professional designer will be like. They worked directly with Room & Board, a Minneapolis-based company known for modern, artisan-crafted furniture and accessories. The 17 students each had three weeks to design a product, with the possibility of their design being manufactured and sold. “I learned what it’s really like to work as a furniture designer and how fast-paced it is,” said senior Joe Rosewicz. The experience had an even better ending for Rosewicz and two classmates, whose work was judged by company employees as the best in class. Each of them received $1,000 and the opportunity to have Room & Board turn their designs into products.

at Room & Board headquarters to about 30 employees, including the company president.

The final presentation was the third time students met with Room & Board representatives during the project. The first two times, a small group of Room & Board officials came to campus to introduce the project and to provide feedback about halfway through the design process. Brian Linehan, a 2010 UW-Stout graduate and Room & Board merchandise associate, helped coordinate the project with Astwood. He has volunteered to critique students’ work in the past as well. “Working with the students was a great experience for Room & Board and something we hope to do more of in the future,” Linehan said. “The work presented to us was professional, fresh and inspiring. It is awesome to see the program so clearly thriving and growing.”

The company also donated $2,000 to UW-Stout’s industrial design program.

The project was set up as a contest in Industrial Design Senior Studio II taught by Associate Professor Jennifer Astwood. Students presented their final design ideas

20 UW-Stout students, faculty and Room & Board employees gather after students presented their product designs at company headquarters in Minneapolis. Professors Erik Evensen and Jennifer Astwood are in the front row, second and third from left.

SPONSOR OUR EVENTS

ENHANCE YOUR BRAND CONNECTION

For corporations, businesses and other university stakeholders, connecting with UW-Stout doesn’t require coming to UW-Stout. The university also can come to them. Organizations can sponsor an event and host it by working with the Alumni Association and other campus officials. Examples include: Kraus-Anderson Construction hosted a summer alumni gathering on the rooftop of its downtown Minneapolis headquarters. The event gave the company, which employs many UW-Stout graduates, a chance to open its doors to alumni from around the region. Thomson Reuters of Eagan, MN, hosted a reception for the many alumni they employ. The event featured Chancellor Meyer and other UW-Stout leaders providing updates on the university and programs. The company collaborated with the university to develop the digital marketing technology major, including providing classroom instructors. Medtronic, in Minneapolis, hosted university representatives from Career Services, the Discovery Center, the Stout University Foundation and the College of Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Management to discuss how the company can further engage with the university. The group shared many ideas and continues to explore mutually beneficial partnerships. Kalahari Resorts in Wisconsin Dells, where several UW-Stout alumni are top administrators, annually holds a weekend alumni getaway for families that features discounted rooms, food and special events.

Kraus-Anderson hosts UW-Stout alumni at their Minneapolis headquarters.

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GUIDE OUR PROGRAMS

SERVE AS A PROGRAM ADVISORY COMMITTEE MEMBER

UW-Stout’s academic program advisory committees create a winning partnership for employers, faculty and students. Each of our programs has an advisory committee that consists of stakeholders, alumni, faculty, students and successful professionals from across the country, who provide valuable industry insight, dialogue and direction to guide our curriculum. They keep us informed about how well we are meeting their business’ needs, and ensure a strong pipeline of future interns and employees. On a personal level, many members have noted that they enjoy participating to give back and influence the next generation. We have enjoyed a rich history of this mutually beneficial collaboration. Many of these committees started in the early 1990s, however Stout had advisory committees that date back to the 1920s. Typically, advisory committees meet a couple times a year to discuss topics including existing program curriculum, new program development, cooperative education, internships, industry trends and other important initiatives. The committee provides insight, perspective, advice and support. In some cases, students are given the opportunity to meet with advisory committee professionals for reviews of their work and one-on-one feedback about their progress which is often the highlight of the day for committee members.

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CONNECTIONS 2019

SHOWCASE: ADVISORY COMMI TTEE IN ACTON

Although advisory committees are typically not involved in directly financially supporting our academic programs, seven of eight $1,500 scholarships for incoming first-year plastics engineering students were recently funded by advisory committee members to meet industry demand. Steve Maki is vice president of technology at RTP Company in Winona, MN, and a member of the plastics engineering advisory committee. Maki’s company funded one of scholarships. “There is a high demand for plastics engineers that is not being filled, particularly in the Midwest where there is a lot of injection molding,” Maki stated. Additional companies involved with developing the scholarships included Advanced Molding

Technologies (AMT), Andersen Corporation, EVCO, Nolato Contour, Phillips-Medisize, and Scientific Molding Corporation (SMC). “First-year scholarships are important to campus since it facilitates our ability to recruit the best and brightest students in the region,” said Chuck Bomar, dean of the College of Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Management. “This partnership is important to the mission,” he added. “We speak often about student success and this best happens when we work collaboratively with our industry partners.”

I love to share that excitement for my major and career opportunities in the future. We’re helping groom the next generation of designers and engineers. We help bring that real-world scenario to the professors and the students. “ “ Peggy Troudt, director of

3M has partnered with UW-Stout over several decades through advisory committees. I’ve had the ability to provide input into various programs at Stout. Seeing input from an employer...has been an advantage for both student and employer.

Jeff Asproth, Global Supply Chain Manager at 3M, is a 2000 UW-Stout graduate.

product design at Target Corp. in Minneapolis, is a 1984 UW-Stout apparel graduate who has been a member of the apparel design and development advisory committee about 10 years.

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BRING YOUR PROJECT TO US

FACULTY AND STUDENT RESEARCH

The Discovery Center leverages the exceptional creative and technical skills of UW-Stout faculty, staff and students to develop innovative solutions to real world problems. Through collaborative interdisciplinary projects, we challenge students to apply classroom knowledge and problem-solving skills through interaction with other students, faculty and industry. Faculty, staff and students work individually or in teams to develop an understanding of the research question or industry challenge, determine and weigh potential solutions and execute implementation of the selected solution. With focus on research, the Discovery Center continues to help industry partners solve current and future challenges, along with assisting entrepreneurs as they venture forward to develop, design and build prototypes and address myriad business challenges to help their venture move forward. In the past, we have served food manufacturers with safety concerns and product developments. We have assisted component packaging systems engineers with plastics and product testing and analysis. This helped to identity quality issues and potential financial gains for the company. Working with multiple manufacturers and entrepreneurs, the industrial design faculty, for example, has developed designs and prototypes as an outcome of the creative design process, which helped to solve company problems and/or grow their business. As a center, our collaborative nature is key to the success of applied research for both UW-Stout and our industry partners.

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CONNECTIONS 2019

SHOWCASE: INDUSTRY FOCUSED FACULTY EXTERNSHIP

Dean Wirtanen, an assistant professor in the construction major at UW-Stout, routinely takes his students to job sites and to manufacturers for on-site experience. Recently Wirtanen took a “field trip” by himself, although his students still will be the beneficiaries. He helped on three construction projects with Market & Johnson Inc., an Eau Claire-based company. The work was part of a 10-week, 400-hour Faculty Externship through Associated General Contractors of America’s Education and Research Foundation, with equal financial support from Market & Johnson and UW-Stout. The goal of the externship is to make sure professors — and therefore their students — are up to date with industry best practices and standards. “It will affect every course I teach in a very positive way,” Wirtanen said. Wirtanen didn’t just observe but, per the internship, was part of the crew. He helped with a six-story apartment-commercial complex, a three-story apartment building and a renovation, all in Eau Claire. His duties included estimating, getting bids from subcontractors, hiring subcontractors and preparing and updating construction schedules.

Several other crew members on the projects were UW-Stout alumni, including Matt Faulkner, an executive vice president with Market & Johnson. He also is on UW-Stout’s construction advisory committee. “Most students end up working for a general contractor, or subcontractor, who works for general contractors,” Wirtanen said. “The externship is directed at where our graduates will end up.” Associated General Contractors is a professional organization for contractors who work in the construction industry. The externship was developed by members of the AGC Education and Research Foundation and the Associated Schools of Construction.

Dean Wirtanen, an associate professor in the construction program at UW-Stout, visits the Haymarket Landing building site in Eau Claire, one of three he worked during an internship with Market & Johnson Inc.

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DEVELOP YOUR TEAM

BUSINESS AND INDUSTRY PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

UW-Stout’s Discovery Center supports the mission of UW-Stout by providing adult learners with access to education and resources for the enrichment of their lives, both personally and professionally. The Discovery Center’s Professional Education offerings include conferences, workshops, seminars, and certificate programs designed for business & industry, educators, leadership, rehabilitation professionals and much more. Custom programs are also offered tailoring to specific business or organizational strategy and growth objectives. Working as partners, we will identify your educational needs and define learning objectives for the program. Delivery can be at UW-Stout or at a location convenient to the user, engaging credentialed faculty and instructors with subject matter expertise matched to learning objectives and culture. Every year, businesses, agencies, organizations, colleges and departments service their constituents in conferences, workshops, seminars, and video conferences. UW-Stout handles the details and arrangements for successful events ranging in size from five people to several thousand.

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Keynote speaker, Dr. Dipesh Navsaria, at the 38th annual Early Childhood Education Conference.

CONNECTIONS 2019

Programs for Business & Industry: · Administrative Lean · Basic Manufacturing Skills Development · Business Writing · ExporTech™ · Further Food Safety · ISO International Standards Training · Lean Certificate Series · Manufacturing Advantage Series · Preventive Controls Qualified Individual (PCQI) for Human Food Training · Project Management Certificate · Plastics Technology Certificate (in partnership with UW-Milwaukee School of Continuing Education)

Programs for Educators: · ECE Professional Development Program: Exchange Press · WiFAB Retreat · Fab Lab Discovery Series · Career and Technical Education Summit Programs for Leadership: · High Performing Cultures · Organizational Leadership · Leadership Academy · Enhancing Your Leadership Skills Half-Day Seminars: · Communication · Emotional Intelligence · Problem Solving · Servant Leadership · Navigating the Pull of Change · The Extraordinary Leader

Programs for Rehabilitation Professionals: · Stout Vocational Rehabilitation Institute Other Programs: · GRE, GMAT, and LSAT Test Prep Courses · How to Get Started in Game Development · Legal Studies Certificate

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CONNECTIONS 2019

SHOWCASE: PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT FOR EDUCATORS USING FAB LAB TOOLS

Breanne Kanak, who teaches art and design in the White Lake School District, learned a lot about failure during the Discovery Center WiFab Retreat at UW-Stout. She loved every minute of it. “We had to design, iterate, trash and finalize our projects and challenges,” Kanak said. “Every day there were moments that were humbling, frustrating, empowering and even inspiring. It was just like teaching; except this time, we were the students, in all our anger and glory,” Kanak said. In addition to overseeing a variety of business oriented outreach services, the Discovery Center also works with K-12 educators in the Fab Lab. This unique collaboration can also provide businesses who partner with UW-Stout with opportunities to participate in this type of outreach as well. UW-Stout hosts the annual WiFab Retreat West, a five-day summer immersion in design and digital fabrication for middle and high school teachers. Another retreat is held in Appleton. This is just one of the many ways the Discovery Center connects learning at all levels with business and industry practices. The goal is to help teachers not only how to learn to use Fab Lab equipment but to have meaningful instruction for their students that enhances education. “What we’re offering is the STEM curriculum and how to use the resources in the school to support and enrich STEM education,” said Ken Welty, a retreat instructor from UW-Stout’s School of Education.

Attendee Mark Westlake said the retreat’s “try-it style of instruction allowed me to assimilate to the equipment right away and gave me focus when working through curricular questions.” UW-Stout’s Discovery Center Fab Lab was founded in 2013 with the assistance of a multiyear $520,000 Growth Agenda award from the UW System. It features digital fabrication machines that are programmed through computer software. In addition, UW-Stout has developed a web portal, wifabcooperative.com, that allows Fab Lab schools to communicate with one another on issues such as curriculum development and implementation; equipment usage; and training.

WiFAB participants apply new skills and work on projects at the UW-Stout Fab Lab.

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CONNECTIONS 2019

DISCOVERY CENTER EVENTS

· Criminal Justice and Rehabilitation Conference · Early Childhood Education Conference · Family and Consumer Sciences Education and WI DPI Child Care Conference · Midwest Craft Brewers Conference · National Rural Institute on Alcohol and Drug Abuse · Polytechnic Summit · Red Cedar Watershed Conference

DISCOVERY CENTER BY THE NUMBERS

$1.48M IN INCREASED CLIENT SALES, COST SAVINGS, AND INVESTMENTS 3,500+ SERVED ANNUALLY BY PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS AND EVENTS 195 COLLABORATIVE PROJECTS 186 STUDENTS AND FACULTY ENGAGED IN PROJECTS

9.6

CUSTOMER SATISFACTION RATING ON A 10-POINT SCALE

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SOLVE BUSINESS CHALLENGES

MANUFACTURING CONSULTATION AND APPLIED RESEARCH SERVICES

UW-Stout looks for ways to efficiently match your business challenge with our applied research interests. Our research partnerships range from comprehensive strategic collaborations to targeted projects that address a specific issue. We also facilitate appropriate agreements with industry to protect intellectual property, advance SBIR/STTR programs, and advance UW-Stout technologies from development through licensing. The UW-Stout Manufacturing Outreach Center (MOC) recognizes that individual organizations are one of a kind and works side-by-side with industry leaders to find reliable, informed answers and customized solutions to the challenges they face. Throughout 33 northwestern Wisconsin counties, the MOC delivers services tailored to specific circumstances. From process improvement to strategic direction, workforce training to technology implementation and so much more. The UW-Stout MOC was established 25 years ago as part of the 1994 Federal Technology Project with the National Institute of Standards and Technology/ Hollings Manufacturing Extension Partnership (NIST MEP) as its statutory funding source. Formed as a partnership between UW-Stout and regional technical colleges, the MOC is headquartered within the Discovery Center. Since its inception, the MOC has helped to create and save over 5,500 state manufacturing jobs with client-reported impacts of almost $800 million.

Bill Amsrud, operations manager at UW-Stout MOC, works with Julie Berndt, Vice president of operations at Johnson Electric Coil Company, Antigo, WI

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CONNECTIONS 2019

SHOWCASE: VOLM PACKS STRATEGIC CHANGE INTO COMPANY -WIDE INI T IAT IVE

Situation Volm Companies senior leadership sought to fundamentally change the company for the better by creating a Lean workplace culture that involves and empowers every Volm employee. To successfully implement such a big change, they knew they’d need a long- term strategic process, not just a quick fix. Solution Volm Companies COO Michael Hunter invited UW-Stout Manufacturing Outreach Center (MOC) to help the company develop this strategy in fall 2011, initiating an ongoing partnership that continues to generate profound, company-wide improvements. To start, MOC project managers Bill Amsrud and Brad Nasset listened and learned from Volm leadership. Relying on these discussions and initial assessments, MOC led a one-day Lean training workshop so Volm senior leaders and key production staff could understand the vocabulary of change, envision the possibilities and commit themselves to project success. Action teams then applied these new ideas to significantly improve Volm’s equipment layout, quality, safety, and productivity. Continuous improvements have expanded as staff from all departments and management levels train with MOC to become Lean facilitators, leaders, administrators and champions. Routine status checks by UW-Stout validate and guide the process as it evolves. The company now shares performance information with staff and offers an incentive of paid time off if goals are met.

UW-Stout MOC Projects In addition to Lean transformation and employee empowerment, Volm Companies has consulted with MOC regarding leadership coaching, exportation process (ExporTech), technology scouting, plastics fundamentals, order entry, industry sales, empowerment growth tracking, and more. Results Volm Companies cites $23.8M in total impacts, including:

1. $2.8M+ in cost savings 2. $13.5M+ in total investment 3. $7.5M in total sales 4. 81 new or retained jobs

5. 94 percent reduction of scrap at one process 6. 20+ machine-days gained in production capacity

Kevin Thiel, senior project manager at UW-Stout MOC, works with Joe Zanon, director of manufacturing at Volm Companies Fresh Tech Products plant.

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SUPPORT YOUR FUTURE EMPLOYEES

SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES

There are many ways your organization can support UW-Stout programs and students, receive a tax deduction and gain recognition for your business at the same time. Financial contributions made through the Stout University Foundation may be directed to support a specific campus program and provide a branding opportunity for your organization through naming of university facilities or on spaces within a classroom or laboratory. There are also many opportunities to positively impact students’ experiences through financial support of undergraduate research projects or student attendance at national competitions or conferences. “In-kind” gifts of gently-used equipment, software or consumable materials as well as equipment leases or loans can be a cost-effective way to provide students current technology, which supports their ability to enter your field’s workforce ready to hit the ground running.

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UW-Stout student Francis Barriga, right, hugs donor Jillian Obarski at a Stout University Foundation scholoarship reception.

CONNECTIONS 2019

SCHOLARSHIPS

Scholarships have significant impact on students attending college today. Scholarships not only provide financial relief, but also recognize a student’s achievements while investing in his/her future. Establishing a scholarship helps ensure students know about your company and its philosophy and priorities. Scholarship donors can meet and get to know scholarship recipients through personal contacts throughout the year. All scholarships are customized based on the donor’s priorities and can target students from specific programs.

Two types of scholarships are available:

Annual scholarships donations made to the Stout University Foundation that are awarded to students directly at the annual Scholarship Reception.

Endowed scholarships are investments that provide ongoing scholarship funding. A minimum of $30,000 is invested with a single gift or multi-year pledge, and the earnings are used to fund annual scholarships in perpetuity.

450

AVERAGE ANNUAL NUMBER OF STUDENTS WHO RECEIVE FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIPS

$30,000

AVERAGE STUDENT LOAN DEBT FOR UW-STOUT STUDENTS

$1,000

AVERAGE ANNUAL SCHOLARSHIP AMOUNT STUDENTS RECEIVE

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INVEST IN THE FUTURE

DONATIONS FROM OUR PARTNERS ENABLE OUR LONG- TERM SUCCESS

One way for businesses to drive their company and industry forward is to make an investment in their future by investing in UW-Stout.

In recent years, three companies have committed to the long-term success of university academic programs with large donations that target specific areas:

• In the real estate property management program, Dean Weidner, owner of Weidner Apartment Homes, donated $1 million to establish the Weidner Center for Residential Property Management. • In the sciences, a major gift established the Rajiv and Swati Lall Microbiology Laboratory. The Lalls own Vets Plus, a global leader in developing, manufacturing and distributing food and companion animal health products and treats. • In the packaging program, Prent Corporation of Janesville donated $1 million, with half for new equipment in the Prent Packaging Laboratories and half to establish the Prent Packaging Equipment and Technology Fund.

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CONNECTIONS 2019

SHOWCASE: THE IMPACT OF IN-KIND DONAT IONS

The value of hands-on learning, one of the hallmarks of a UW-Stout education, can depend significantly on what exactly students are getting their hands on. Thanks to in-kind equipment donations and industry partnerships in 2017-18 totaling more than $1.5 million, students have new industry- standard equipment in three labs. Plastics engineering Professor, Adam Kramschuster, worked with three leading injection molding equipment companies, Arburg, Engel and Milacron, to secure three new machines on loan in the Jarvis Hall lab. New machines will rotate in every few years. “We have one of the premier labs in the U.S., and it’s because the industry values this program and wants to get information about their equipment in here for our students,” Kramschuster said. Two Dell EMC employees who are UW-Stout alumni installed about a dozen pieces of high-tech equipment in the Computer Networking and Information Technology (CNIT) lab. “This is the most cutting-edge, emerging technology,” said Associate Professor Holly Yuan, CNIT program director. “Dell is really interested in seeing the program develop and grow.” A company that wishes to remain anonymous donated two custom-designed robotics machines for engineering technology department labs, which serves students in the manufacturing engineering, mechanical engineering and engineering technology programs. The donation was coordinated through the Phillips Medisize facility in Menomonie, which used the machines to make medical device parts. “We want our students to be the ones who design this equipment,” said Professor Tom Lacksonen, chair of the engineering and technology department.

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SPONSORSHIP RECOGNITION

NAMING OPPORTUNITIES ON CAMPUS

One of the strongest ways to leave your mark on UW-Stout’s campus is to literally establish your brand at Stout.

For more than 50 years UW-Stout has worked closely with our philanthropic arm, Stout University Foundation, to identify university priorities that can benefit from private donations.

Donations improve academic programs, enhance student and faculty growth and upgrade labs, campus buildings, grounds and more.

In some cases, philanthropy can result in naming opportunities, cementing those donors’ legacy of support.

A recent case in point is the 2017 dedication of UW-Stout’s Robert F. Cervenka School of Engineering. It was named in Cervenka’s honor to recognize his lifetime of philanthropy to UW-Stout, including a memorial gift of $2.5 million from Cervenka’s family. Cervenka was the founder of Phillips Plastics, today an international company known as Phillips Medisize. Chancellor Bob Meyer said the school naming “will take our engineering programs to the next level.”

From left, Chancellor Bob Meyer; Debbie Cervenka, wife of the late Robert F. Cervenka; Tom Lacksonen, chair of the engineering and technology department; Mark Parsons, Stout University Foundation; and Chuck Bomar, dean of the College of Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics and Management.

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